Samsung and Acer to Debut Google Chromebooks on June 15th; Game Changer?

Discussion in 'Android Tablet News' started by dgstorm, May 12, 2011.

  1. dgstorm

    dgstorm Editor in Chief Staff Member

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    [​IMG]

    For the longest time, Microsoft and it's OS have pretty much dominated the world's Personal Computer OS market with its various iterations of Windows. One could argue that Apple's OS has always been around to compete with it, but Microsoft still holds over 80% of the world's home computer market, so, based on the numbers, its hard to call Apple really competitive in the PC market (even if many people think it is a better alternative). No other company has really ever truly "stepped up to the plate" to design an OS to try to compete with the MS Juggernaut, until now...

    Google has been working hard on the ChromeOS for quite some time now, and late yesterday at Google I/O they announced their new version of it will be running on a couple of netbooks. One is from Samsung, and the other is from Acer.

    This could have massive potential, since the ChromeOS "steps outside the box" of traditional thinking when it comes to an Operating System, and is browser-based. If you look carefully into your technological crystal ball, it's not hard to envision a future where everything is cloud-based (all applications are handled by massive server networks instead of stored on your local machine). The ChromeOS, and these two new netbooks, could be the herald of that future dawning. It's apparent that Google sees this possible future too, and in fact, they are obviously "banking" on it as they are developing products specifically geared toward making it happen. Now that Samsung and Acer, two of the largest manufacturers in the world have decided to give the ChromeOS a shot, we could be seeing the beginning of a snow-ball effect, with more manufacturers trying it out.

    Ultimately, the fate of this vision of the future will be decided by consumers, so let's dive right into the features of these two ChromeOS netbooks from Samsung and Acer, and you can decide for yourself if it appeals to you. Here are the feature highlights taken straight from Google's ChromeOS webpage:

    Samsung ChromeOS Netbook / Samsung ChromeBook = $429
    • 12.1" (1280x800) 300 nit Display
    • 3.26 lbs / 1.48 kg
    • 8.5 hours of continuous usage 1
    • Intel® AtomTM Dual-Core Processor
    • Built in dual-band Wi-Fi and World-mode 3G (optional)
    • HD Webcam with noise cancelling microphone
    • 2 USB 2.0 ports
    • 4-in-1 memory card slot
    • Mini-VGA port
    • Fullsize Chrome keyboard
    • Oversize fully-clickable trackpad
    [​IMG]
    Acer ChromeOS Netbook / Acer ChromeBook = $399
    • 11.6" HD Widescreen CineCrystalTM LED-backlit LCD
    • 2.95 lbs. | 1.34 kg.
    • 6 hours of continuous usage 1
    • Intel® AtomTM Dual-Core Processor
    • Built in dual-band Wi-Fi and World-mode 3G (optional)
    • HD Webcam with noise cancelling microphone
    • High-Definition Audio Support
    • 2 USB 2.0 ports
    • 4-in-1 memory card slot
    • HDMI port
    • Fullsize Chrome keyboard
    • Oversize fully-clickable trackpad
    [​IMG]
    And, here are the features of Google's ChromeOS itself:
    When all is said and done, if Google can manage to make it easier to use than Microsoft's OS, and they market it well, then they might just have a hit on their hands. They do have an uphill battle as they must convince manufacturers to begin adopting ChromeOS for their products. Interestingly, the growth of smartphones will ultimately help their cause, since they are similar in form, if not function, to cloud-based computing, and it gets people used to the idea of having a computer that isn't a PC. Perhaps we are seeing the start of a real "game changer" in the world of Personal Computers... what do you think?

    You can discuss the exciting Chrome OS and the new hardware coming out at the Chrome OS Forums. Visit: Chrome OS Forum

    Source: ChromeOSForums.net via Google Chromebooks
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2011
  2. rjgtr

    rjgtr Member

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    Cloud computing sounds great, but we've seen this model before and it resulted in the personal computer. It used to be that terminals were dumb and all computing happened on the Collosus in a computer room. The PC replaced that model for all but very specific computing needs.

    In the mid 90s Oracle pushed the same model again, saying it was better for companies to have smart terminals but put every bit of data on a mainframe. This idea also failed.

    The problem is that no-one cares more about their own data than the user. That's why the PC was so successful. People want to control their own destiny. People wanting to access their computers over the Web, but with the large number of data breaches that happen everyday (latest=Sony), do people really want everything on a server that someone can hack into?

    I guess the other side of the argument is that people already download their entertainment and keep a lot of personal data on Facebook, so this isn't too huge a change for a generation raised in the current cyberworld.

    I may be wrong, and time will tell, but I still think personal control of data in a physical sense is still the best way to control your data. I just think it will end up in a small device you can carry in your pocket that has different modes of interfacing, like we're beginning to see with smart phones and tablets. You still control your personal data, but it is just a lot more convenient to access.
     
  3. Nate Rules

    Nate Rules Member

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    I'm glad that Google is pushing cloud computing. I think it will improve computing in general.
     
  4. rokky

    rokky Member

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    One big issue pointed by many critics (with whom I agree, FWIW ;) ) is that these ChromeBooks cost as much as far more capable net/notebooks which can ALSO do "cloud computing". How cost-INeffective is that??
     

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