Stream Music to Car Stereo

Discussion in 'Nexus 7 (2nd Gen)' started by Music, Jan 8, 2014.

  1. Music

    Music Senior Member

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    Hello, I am unfamiliar with this with this technique.

    Is it possible to stream music from the Nexus 7/13 to a car stereo that supports streaming? What about older head units with an AUX IN jack or the rear CD changer connector?

    Whats the procedure, basically?

    Is it even worth the trouble? I usually just insert an MP3 disk, and let the music run until it ends, or I stop for something. I have an MP3 player too, and just let it run (it's too dangerous to fool with it while driving.) CDs are limited in capacity to 700 MB, but the tablet has much more, like a flash drive.

    the only advantage I can see so far is that the tablet is at eye-level, and you don't have to look down at the stereo to change/pause a track.

    My biggest concern is that I can't hear the navigation commands with the music going.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2014
  2. vampirefo.

    vampirefo. Senior Member Developer

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    Last edited: Jan 8, 2014
  3. Music

    Music Senior Member

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    Lessee... You plug the transmitter into a 12V jack. then you connect a wire from the transmitter to the earphone jack on the tablet. Then you tune both to the same FM frequency and hope you hear music.

    I think I would only do something like that if it plugged into the SlimPort.

    Would you really trust something that sophisticated if it cost $5? Don't forget to add in P&P. At the local Walmart, it's $10

    BTW- Can you get micro-USB Y cables? if you d plug somnething into the USB port, you'll have no way to charge the device.
     
  4. Music

    Music Senior Member

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    I've tried the FM transmitter in my car for the MP3 player, and, frankly, is stinks.. There is probably just one frequency that would really work, and you can't find it. The ones you can find, are full of noise when you play the music, and every few minutes, a radio station cuts in! I preferred to use my cassette player adapter, but now my car's cassette player doesn't seem to work right because of the adapter. The only solution now is to buy a new car or a new radio system, or just listen to the radio.
     
  5. PitCarver

    PitCarver Super Moderator Staff Member

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    My CD changer went out on my truck and I used an FM transmitter that I got at Big Lots, for $10.00, on a recent trip to Nashville. Plugged in an SD card, with my music, and was very satisfied. The trick with them is to verify the empty frequencies. This might help...http://www.radio-locator.com/cgi-bin/vacant . I've never had to change frequencies, once I set it. (BTW, mine was set to 107.9.)
    I've also got a Satachi transmitter that has similar performance, but costs 4 times as much.
     
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  6. Music

    Music Senior Member

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    I think the real trick to this is to find a quiet frequency. The "digital" tuning helps, so you can go though every frequency (which I did) to find one that "works" which never really happens, because you get some residual sound from a nearby station no matter what. You also need to keep the transmitter away from the radio display, USB adapters, and other stuff that will add noise to the signal. I have a couple frequencies that I am using (transmitter has two "memories"), and I have to keep the transmitter down on the floor by the centre console.

    I suppose new cars have inputs for stuff like MP3 players or a USB port or for music files.
     

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